The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

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Bruges Group Blog

Spearheading the intellectual battle against the EU. And for new thinking in international affairs.
James Alexander Coghlan is a published academic, author and poet. He has lectured in 7 countries and enjoys political discourses. His first novel The Impossible Journey was released in India, 2009. He is published in 5 genres.

IF

How will the word 'if' be powerful in the context of the EU and Brexit negotiations? As Philip II of Macedon found out, sometimes there are battles that brute force will not win. Battles where threats and punishment do not work against a counterpart. Philip II of Macedon had defeated numerous enemies when he sent the following warning message to an...
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The Brexit Legacy

There are a variety of reasons why the EU has doomed itself following the creation of Article 50. It is akin to Superman building a Kryptonite factory. Perhaps a more apt metaphor would be a fisherman widening the gaps in his nets without quality control checks. Could either the superhero or the fisherman hold a 3rd party responsible for the outcom...
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A History of Brexit

Managing the Brexit negotiations is merely one aspect of Brexit. In the coming years much will be written (presumably by both sides) as to the rights and wrongs of why the UK population by percentage voted to leave the EU on 23 June 2016. You know that books will be written examining why and how Brexit came about. Someone will try and lay the blame...
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Not My Brexit

In the last year we have seen the ordinary person take on the establishment and win. Not just here in the UK, but also across the pond in the USA. Against great odds both Brexit and Trump became victories. The blatant lies that mainstream media carried included the fact there would not be an EU Army. In the USA women who had yelled rape with regard...
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CANZUK - The Genesis of a Post-Brexit Culture

Before 23 June 2016 people toyed with the idea of the UK being free of the EU in trade, economic and immigration policies. However, even if the UK had voted to Remain in the EU, it would not have been able to benefit from such concepts as CANZUK (Australia, Canada, New Zealand and UK group). It is noteworthy that these 4 members are also part of th...
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Brand Britain Beyond Brexit

When we inevitably run out of a product, we go to the shops and buy a new one. We are not told what to buy. There is no security to ensure we select Brand A instead of Brand B. We have a choice. Product placement is a reality, in many stores, but we have real choices. After Brexit, the EU and UK have very real choices too. They both must win over...
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Debunking the Brexit Myths

During the referendum campaign both sides made considerable remarks (some justified, others less so) about the state of trade, the economy and employment and whether the UK voted Leave or Remain on 23 June 2016. One year on we have learnt many things including the reality of an EU army. We have also learnt that Australia, Canada, New Zealand and th...
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The Will to Act

In the referendum on 23 June 2016 the majority of British people voted Leave. In doing so, they placed the cornerstone of a new future for the U.K. beyond the E.U. Some politicians, mainstream media and many pollsters failed to remember how the will to act had built the British Empire, Commonwealth and NATO. The will to act against questionable ves...
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The Five Eyes - Security after Brexit

The UK will continue to thrive due to its existing linguistic and intelligence connections

1st August 2017
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I come from a family who have served on Five Continents for their country in both military and civilian platforms. As such, I became aware of the Five Eyes as a youngster.  The Five Eyes is a joint intelligence community comprising of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the United States.   Initially the Five Eyes or FVEY was formed in 1941. It is therefore arguable, given the geographical locations of its members and their historical endurance, that no amount of pressure from the EU will cause it to falter.

 

FVEY operates beyond the remit of the EU. All are members of NATO and this will not change irrespective of Brexit. Brexit is inconsequential in matters of Intelligence.  Few in the Remain camp have even acknowledged this central pillar of British government that will endure beyond the legal confinements of any Brexit deal that London has with Brussels, if such a deal is even achieved.  The UKUSA Agreement of 1946 may have evolved, but nevertheless it shall remain a core part of British domestic and foreign security information gathering and sharing post-Brexit.

 

Cooperation between Five Eyes members will be ongoing, parallel to any changes within the EU.  Whereas some MPs feel that Britain will be left 'out in the cold,' (as if a new Cold War has developed), historical facts and agreements between the Five Eyes members will ensure this does not happen.  Unlike their European counterparts, the Five eyes all share the same language which in terms of intelligence communication can only be of significant benefit to all concerned.

 

According to James Cox, “Precise assignments are not publicly known, but research indicates that Australia monitors South and East Asia emissions. New Zealand covers the South Pacific and Southeast Asia.  The UK devotes attention to Europe and Western Russia, while the US monitors the Caribbean, China, Russia, the Middle East and Africa.”[1] It is hard to argue in any way that these arrangements will somehow change after the UK formally leaves the EU.

 

Incidentally, Human Intelligence gathering will not change post-Brexit. Signals Intelligence gathering will also remain unchanged. The other forms of Intelligence gathering will also be unaffected by the process of Brexit.  So too the agencies such as GCHQ, Canadian Security Intelligence Service and Central Intelligence Agency. These pillars will continue to support the national security of their respective countries independently and jointly when necessary.

 

There are numerous challenges ahead for the Five Eyes, once the UK takes her place back on the International stage.  These challenges will not be compounded by Brexit, but they could be alleviated by them.  Terrorism goes beyond the EU. So, too kidnappings and murders. Crime has become high tech and so too have the agencies targeting them.

 

Overall, it can be argued that the UK will continue to thrive due to its existing linguistic and intelligence connections. We must remember and acknowledge that the UK's Intelligence community is one of the oldest and most respected in the world, on top of being part of the Five Eyes.

 

By James Coghlan

 


[1] Canada and the Five Eyes Intelligence Community, James Cox, Strategic Studies Working Group Papers, December 2012, page 4

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