The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

If you not change browser settings, you agree to it. Learn more

I understand

Cookies are a technology which we use to provide you with tailored information on our website. A cookie is a piece of code that is sent to your internet browser and is stored on your system.

Please see below for a list of cookies this website uses:

Cookie name: _utma, _utmb, _utmc, _utmz

Purpose: Google Analytics cookies. Google Analytics is software that lets us analyse how visitors use our site. We use this information to improve our website and provide the best experience to visitors.

Function: These cookies collect data in an anonymous form. Please see Google's privacy policy for further information. To opt out of these cookies, please visit Google's website.

Cookie name: Sitecore

Purpose: Stores information, such as language and regional preferences, that our content management system (the system we use to update our website) relies on to function.

Function: This is a session cookie and will be destroyed when you close your browser. This cookie is essential for our website to function.

Cookie name: ASP.net_session

Purpose: Allows the website to save your session state across different pages. For example, if you have completed a survey, the website will remember that you have done so and will not ask you to complete it again when you view another page on the website.

Function: This is a session cookie and will be destroyed when you close your browser. This cookie is essential for our website to function.

Cookie name: website#sc_wede

Purpose: Indicates whether the user's browser supports inline editing of content. This indicates whether our content management system will work for our website administrators in their internet browsers.

Function: This is a session cookie and will be destroyed when you close your browser. This cookie is essential for our website to function.

Cookie name: redirected

Purpose: Remembers when the site forwards you from one page to another, so you can return to the first page. For example, go back to the home page after viewing a special 'splash' page.

Function: This is a session cookie, which your browser will destroy when it shuts down. The website needs this cookie to function.

Cookie name: tccookiesprefs

Purpose: Remembers when you respond to the site cookie policy, so you do not see the cookie preferences notice on every page.

Function: If you choose to remember your preference with a temporary cookie, your browser will remove it when you shut it down, otherwise the cookie will be stored for about a year.

Cookie name: _ga

Purpose: Additional Google Analytics cookie. Google Analytics is software that lets us analyse how visitors use our site. We use this information to improve our website and provide the best experience to visitors.

Function: These cookies collect data in an anonymous form. Please see Google's privacy policy for further information.

Cookie name: SC_ANALYTICS_GLOBAL_COOKIE, SC_ANALYTICS_SESSION_COOKIE

Purpose: Sitecore Analytics is software that lets us analyse how visitors use our site. We use this information to improve our website and provide the best experience to visitors.

Function: These cookies collect data in an anonymous form. When you close your browser, it will delete the 'session' cookie; it will keep the 'global' cookie for about one year.

Facebook cookies

We use Facebook 'Like' buttons to share site feedback. For further information, see Facebook's cookie policy page.

Twitter cookies

We use Twitter 'Tweet' buttons to share site feedback. For further information, see Twitter's privacy statement.

YouTube cookies

We embed videos from our official YouTube channel. YouTube uses cookies to help maintain the integrity of video statistics, prevent fraud and to improve their site experience. If you view a video, YouTube may set cookies on your computer once you click on the video player.

Cookies pop-up

When you close the cookies pop-up box by clicking "OK", a permanent cookie will be set on your machine. This will remember your preference so that the pop-up doesn't display across any pages whenever you visit the website.

Opting out/removing cookies

To opt out of Google Analytics cookies, please visit Google’s website.

You can also control what cookies you accept through your internet browser. For details on how to do this, please visit aboutcookies.org. Please note that by deleting our cookies or disabling future cookies you may not be able to access certain areas or features of our website.

mailing list
donate now
join now
shop

Bruges Group Blog

Spearheading the intellectual battle against the EU. And for new thinking in international affairs.

Heseltine: A Bridge Too Far




In the last few days while most of us have been enjoying the celebrations with our families, Brexit has come to the fore once again. A bit like left-over Turkey that is 3 days old, many on the right have little stomach for the pro-eu stance of Lord Michael Heseltine. Indeed, Lord Tebbit and other notable Conservatives have insisted that the whip should be withdrawn from Lord Heseltine. As a former Deputy Prime Minister questions must be asked about the reasons why Lord Heseltine feels the need to undermine Theresa May and her Brexit team.


What motivation does Lord Heseltine have for this public betrayal of trust? Is it personal, political or financial? Is he privy to information that the Cabinet do not have access to? If so, why would he (if putting the interests of the UK first) withhold that same information from her Majesty's Government?


In his day Michael Hesletine as an MP was a force to be reckoned with. During the premiership of Margaret Thatcher he challenged her for the role of Prime Minister. Ultimately, he failed. Times have changed and once close allies and friends have condemned his most recent attack on core Conservatism. We could ignore his taunting of Theresa May and her colleagues as some suggest. However, the underlying threat of other MPs and Lords would see this as weakness and may be encouraged to pursure a similar tact. Conversely, like The Bruges Group, Bow Group, Lord Tebbit, Lord Lamont, Anne Widdecombe, John Redwood and Ben Harris-Quinney we could denounce the personal attack by Lord Heseltine on the biggest democratic vote the UK has ever seen. For it is not just his colleagues that an anti-Brexit stance decries. It is the families of hard working Brits who despite their reservations pursued a Leave vote on 23 June 2016.


In advocating for a Corbyn government to block Brexit, Lord Heseltine some would argue has gone a bridge too far. In so doing he has abandoned his party allegiance and his right to retain the whip. For that reason alone he must surely have the whip withdrawn. And so should anyone else who stands against Theresa May's government during Brexit negotiations. It cannot be argued that MPs and Lords defying the biggest ever public vote in the UK is in the interests of Conservatives or their core values.


If Tarzan has been in the EU jungle or Lords jungle so long that he has lost touch with the average voter then by all means the whip should be removed. There is no point ignoring what may be seen as a personal vanity trip by the less polite or another display of lack of loyalty by others. Having openly admitted he plans to block Brexit "at all costs,"i the time for talking to Lord Heseltine and others who have voted against the UK government has long since passed. There simply is no point in attempting to fan out the flames of rebellion while attempting at the same time to have negotiations with Brussels. There simply is no point IF the UK government and its think tanks are serious about delivering for the biggest ever UK vote in denying that these domestic rebels exist. They must have the whip removed. There can be no other course of action. Theresa May needs to show the strength of Margaret Thatcher with the cunning of Churchill in removing Lords, MPs and others who would openly defy the 17 million voters. The time to act to secure Brexit is now Prime Minister.


Lord Heseltine who is facing calls to have the Whip removed

Max Manus OR As the Norwegians Like It
Brexit Negotiations
 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Saturday, 20 January 2018