The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.

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The EU Referendum and the Asian Vote

Finding our support in new communities

Arun Singh Ahluwalia and Susanna Dyre-Greensite
4th June 2016
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Our activists find that contrary to the Government's propaganda the Leave message is winning in the most ethnically diverse parts of London.

There is a misconception particularly within UK media and elitist chattering classes that immigrants by default favour immigration. This defies logic as the first group of people who suffer from more immigration are immigrants. Few wealthy Chinese or rich Russian oligarchs might move into Knightsbridge or Mayfair but the majority of new comers settle into the already overcrowded and deprived areas of our dilapidated metropolis. Therefore whether it is Southall in West London or Tower Hamlets in East London both areas of ethnic diversity there are tens of thousands of established British Asians who will vote to leave the EU on 23rd June.

The sub continent is a bastion of world democracy where turnout at all sorts of elections can reach 95%. So why would these same folk when in the UK vote for what they know is a totally undemocratic institution far away from their community. Further, ask many of them, they will tell you free movement within the EU is responsible for the untenable burden on housing, schools, the NHS and all sorts of other services. These British Asians will also tell you they came here gradually over decades so have had time enough to assimilate. In contrast, in just a ten year period UK has taken in 3.5 million EU migrants. This is all too fast and leads to a fractious society . It indeed is not ironic that on the recent ITV debate it actually took an Asian immigrant to wrong foot David Cameron on this.

London is not for Remain. There is clearly a great deal of support for Leaving the EU especially in diverse parts of the capital such as in Southall. The undemoractic nature of the EU is a big concern for people. Uncontrolled immigration is also a major issue, especially for those who are settled in the UK.