Tel. +44 (0)20 7287 4414
Email. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tel. +44 (0)20 7287 4414
Email. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.
The Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the European Union and, above all, against the emergence of a centralised EU state.
Image
Image
Image
Image

Review on Gambling Restrictions in the UK Coming Up

tennis-4532445_1920

In the UK, the Gambling Act 2005 is the legislation which governs online betting, but as this law was devised more than 15 years ago, there are concerns that it may no longer be fully fit for purpose.

Therefore, the government has announced a review of the UK gambling laws, specifically to assess what needs to be done for digital play.

Scope of Review

The Culture Secretary announced the review, pointing out the need to update legislation to cover all types of online play.

While digital gambling has been around for some time, it's achieved far greater popularity in recent years. A review of the Gambling Act 2005 will identify whether there are any gaps or loopholes as play has shifted from land casinos to online gambling.

As one of the most renowned lobbyists, Entain Group, and their UK-leading Party Casino gambling site, as well as other online providers have staked their reputation on being fully compliant with all aspects of UK law. So this review isn't about clamping down on poor performers. Instead, the Culture Secretary wants to assess whether regulation needs to be tightened up and greater protection provided.

Some of the specific areas that will be targeted include:

●Age limits

●Maximum stakes

●Advertising and marketing

Scope and powers of the regulatory body (UK Gambling Commission)

The review will also take particular notice of young players and consider whether they need extra protection.

Changes Already Confirmed

Although the outcome of the review is not yet known, the government has already committed to making one change. The minimum age limit for the National Lottery will be increased from 16 to 18 years of age.

With the soaring popularity of betting and the potential for online play, there are concerns that the lottery could act as a gateway. Playing the lottery is generally considered to be a low-risk activity, but ministers are concerned that youngsters remain protected.

The change will take effect from October 2021.

This isn't the first move that the government has made to guard against underage gambling and the impact of betting. Earlier in the year, a call for evidence into the use of loot boxes in games was launched, amid fears that they entice youngsters to buy extras with no guarantee of any significant goodies in return. The review into loot boxes will determine whether their use is linked to gambling problems.

Safe Enjoyment

The impending review's goal is not to make online gambling difficult or inaccessible but to ensure that the legislation reflects modern technology. Describing the gambling sector as developing at "breakneck speed", the government has said that the bill needs an overhaul to tackle the black market and ensure transparency and fairness in all transactions.

This review follows a tranche of other measures which have already been introduced such as new restrictions on VIP schemes, a ban on the use of credit cards, lower stakes on fixed-odds betting machines and more stringent identity checks. 

The betrayal of British higher education
Brexit’s Affect on UK Online Gaming Appears Minima...

By accepting you will be accessing a service provided by a third-party external to https://brugesgroup.com/

Copyright ©1989-2021 The Bruges Group. All Rights Reserved.
Site designed by WA Designs